Commonly confused words

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Make and Do

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Common Collocations with DO

  • Do a deal

To make an arrangement, esp. in business

Eg: Have you done any deals with distributors in Asia yet?

  • Do business

To be engaged in business, to be involved in commerce or trade.

Eg: We want to do business with you

  • Do damage

To cause harm or damage

eg: Did the storm do much damage?

  • Do the dishes

To wash plates, cups, pots, pans, knives, forks, etc. used to cook and eat a meal

Eg: Whose turn is it to do the dishes tonight?

  • Do the ironing

To iron clothes, sheets, …

Eg: I like listening to the radio while I’m doing the ironing.

  • Do the shopping

To buy food and groceries

Eg: We usually do the shopping at our local supermarket.

  • Do (your) best

Do all you can to succeed

Eg: We did our best to win, but the other team played really well.

  • Do (your) duty

Do what you should do at work, at home, or for your community

Eg: The police were just doing their duty when they arrested him.

  • Do (your) hair

Style your hair. I need the hair dresser to do my hair

Eg: Every morning I do my hair so it looks presentable.

  • Do (your) nails

Paint your nails

Eg: Can you open this envelope for me? I just did my nails and they’re still wet.

  • Do someone a favour

Do something for someone as an act of kindness

He: He did us a big favour by postponing his departure for a couple of weeks.

  • Do harm

To have a bad effect on somebody or something

Eg: The floods didn’t do any serious harm to our crops.

  • Do damage

To cause harm or damage

Eg: Did the storm do much damage?

  • Do better

To improve performance or condition

Eg: We didn’t play well today, but I’m sure we’ll do better next time.

  • Do work

To put effort into a task or a job

Eg: I’ve done enough work for one day. I’m going home.

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Common Collocations with MAKE

  • Make a bed

To neatly arrange the sheets, blankets and pillows on a bed

Eg: Mum says I have to make my bed before I go to school.

  • Make a decision

To decide what to do

Eg: „Have you made a decision yet?“

  • Make a fortune

To make a huge amount of money

Eg: My uncle made a fortune in the software business.

  • Make a fuss

To create unnecessary excitement or concern about something

Eg: I like people who achieve a lot without making a big fuss about what they’re doing.

  • Make a living

To earn money for the things you need in life

Eg: It’s not easy to make a living when the economy’s so bad.

  • Make a mess

To create an untidy or disorganized state or situation

Eg: If rich kids make a mess, their servants tidy things up again.

  • Make a mistake

To do something that’s wrong or has bad results

Eg: Whenever we make mistakes, our teacher corrects them for us.

  • Make a note (of)

To write down something so that you don’t forget it

Eg: I’d better make a note of that, or I might forget.

  • Make a pass at

Flirt with someone

Eg: My best friend’s brother made a pass at me – he asked if I was single and tried to get my phone number.

  • Make a profit

To make money from business or investments

Eg: Big companies employ smart people to ensure they pay very little tax on the huge profits they make.

  • Make a reservation

To book or reserve a seat on a train, a table in a restaurant, a room in a hotel, …

Eg: Shall I make a reservation for 8 o’clock at that Japanese restaurant?

  • Make a takeover bid

To try to get control of something

Eg: The company made a takeover bid for one of its rivals.

  • Make an appearance

To appear; to appear in a performance

Eg: We waited for thirty minutes for the professor to make an appearance, then we went home.

  • Make an effort

To put time and energy into doing something

Eg: You can’t learn a language without making an effort.

  • Make an excuse

To give a reason for doing something you shouldn’t do, or for not doing something you should do

Eg: He got to work late and made some excuse about being stuck in traffic.

  • Make an offer

To state a price you’re willing to pay for something

Eg: He made a generous offer, but I had to turn it down.

  • Make contact

To contact a person or an organisation

Eg: After I get there, I’ll make contact with a number of local trading companies.

  • Make friends

To form new friendships

Eg: Jenny finds it hard to make friends.

  • Make peace

To end hostilities; to reach a peace agreement

Eg: Both countries can rebuild now that they have made peace with each other.

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Different Types of Breads in English

  • White bread

Wholemeal bread is more nutritious than white bread.

  • Wheat bread

Making good wheat bread is a satisfying experience for a number of reasons.

  • Whole grain bread

Parents were sent weekly and coupons for brown rice, whole grain bread, and other healthful foods.

  • Rye bread

Since it is low in calories, rye bread is ideal for dieters.

  • Hot dog bun

I had a hot dog bun for breakfast.

  • Hamburger bun

It’s the hamburger bun what I ordered.

  • Croissant

She bit into a croissant and took a sip of coffee.

  • Swiss roll (U.K) – jelly roll (U.S)

I will have black tea with lemon and sugar and a piece of swiss rolljelly roll.

  • Pretzel

I love pretzels, trail mix, raisins and dried fruit.

  • Bagels

People are eating bagels for lunch, dinner and snacks in between.

  • Donut

She is eating a donut, and the powdered sugar makes more spots on her dress.

  • Rolls

She put some margarine on her roll.

  • Breadsticks

Would you like some more breadstick?

  • French bread/ baguette

French bread goes stale very quickly.

 Bread-Vocabulary2